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This is rather alarming. The New York Times reports that "the average American college graduate's literacy in English declined significantly over the past decade." According to the story, "when the test was last administered, in 1992, 40 percent of the nation's college graduates scored at the proficient level, meaning that they were able to read…

College Literacy

This is rather alarming. The New York Times reports that "the average American college graduate's literacy in English declined significantly over the past decade."

According to the story, "when the test was last administered, in 1992, 40 percent of the nation's college graduates scored at the proficient level, meaning that they were able to read lengthy, complex English texts and draw complicated inferences. But on the 2003 test, only 31 percent of the graduates demonstrated those high-level skills. There were 26.4 million college graduates."

Posted by Joel Schettler on December 20 2005 • Current Affairs

Jailing Journalists

An interesting story in today's New York Times: "The United States is tied with Myanmar for sixth place among countries keeping the most journalists behind bars, according to a  new report from the Committee to Protect Journalists."

According to the report, China tops the list with the most journalists in jail: 32. "A total of 125 writers, editors and photojournalists were held in jails around the world on Dec. 1, 2005, the report said. The tally is 3 higher than were held on Dec. 1, 2004," writes Times reporter Katharin Seelye, "but it is not the highest number in the 25 years that the committee has been keeping track. The highest was 182 journalists jailed in 1995."

Posted by Joel Schettler on December 15 2005 • Journalism

The Enemy Within

Here is the link to Part II of Michael Massing's look at the state of journalism today. In his previous article (see the link in the previous post), Massing looked at the external pressures placed on today's media. With this article, he looks at journalism from the inside out. (Both were subjects in my master's thesis). It's an interesting read.

"For many reporters, the bold coverage of the effects of the hurricane, and of the administration's glaring failure to respond effectively, has helped to begin making up for their timid reporting on the existence of WMD. Among some journalists I've spoken with, shame has given way to pride, and there is much talk about the need to get back to the basic responsibility of reporters, to expose wrongdoing and the failures of the political system," writes Massing. "Will such changes prove lasting?"

Posted by Joel Schettler on December 09 2005 • Journalism