hidden hit counter
From the Latest Entry...
This is another post about custom publishing. Earlier this month, I wrote about how spending on custom work is on the rise. This post is from an interesting article in Folio magazine’s March 20 issue called, “The Clamor Over Custom”; it describes how custom magazine spending is at an all time high. The article calls…

Clamor Over Custom

This is another post about custom publishing. Earlier this month, I wrote about how spending on custom work is on the rise. This post is from an interesting article in Folio magazine’s March 20 issue called, “The Clamor Over Custom”; it describes how custom magazine spending is at an all time high. The article calls it the “golden age of custom communications.” Here is an interesting paragraph.

“Consider that there are more copies of custom magazines distributed than ever—an estimated 34 billion, according to the Custom Publishing Council (CPC)—and that growth in custom is far outpacing growth in advertising overall. And consider that innovative new partnerships are being formed, such as the alliance between National Geographic and The Magazine Group, awards programs are booming, and membership in the CPC has soared, from 25 companies in 2002 to 87 today.”

Posted by Joel on April 29 2006 • Journalism

British Books that Changed the World

An Interesting story in the Independent, listing the dozen most important British books that changed the world. There are some greats here. I never thought about it before, but seeing them listed here makes me realize how much British writers have advanced the world’s thinking: Shakespeare, Isaac Newton’s “Principia Mathematica,” Adam Smith’s “The Wealth of Nations,” and Charles Darwin’s “The Origin of Species.”

Posted by Joel on April 22 2006 • Books

Closing Its Doors

The New York Times has an interesting look at the economics of modern magazine publishing. Budget Living is closing its doors. Despite being very popular with its readers (more than 500,000 subscribers) today’s magazine publishing environment did not allow it to survive.

“Its demise raises a question: If a magazine as smart and cunning as Budget Living could not break through the newsstand, is the independent magazine no longer viable?” asks Times reporter David Carr. “With major publishers creating magazines willy-nilly in every available niche and putting huge marketing and circulation muscle behind them, it now seems almost impossible to be the little-magazine-that-could. If Rolling Stone, Outside or Wired, all successful magazines that were started on a whim and prayer, were cooked up today, would they live long and meaningful existences or would they suffer Budget Living’s fate?”

Posted by Joel on April 08 2006 • Journalism

Custom Publishing

Magazines still find their mark, particularly those created for clients to meet their specific marketing needs. Interesting data from the MPA Custom Publishing Council: “Total custom publishing spending, including production, personnel and distribution was $45.8 billion in 2005, representing a 29 percent increase from last year. U.S. companies are now spending upwards of 25 percent of their marketing budgets on custom publishing, for an average of more than $700,000 per company, per year. About 24 percent of custom publishing spending is spent on magazines.”

Posted by Joel on April 02 2006 • Journalism

State of the News Media

"Scan the headlines of 2005 and one question seems inevitable: Will we recall this as the year when journalism in print began to die?” So begins the Pew Research Center’s study on the state of the news media, released in March. The link to the study offers more than my post from a few days ago. Does the end of news on print mean the end of in-depth journalism. If current trends continue, the answer is certainly yes.

“The ominous announcements gathered steam as the year went on. The New York Times would cut nearly 60 people from its newsroom, the Los Angeles Times 85; Knight Ridder’s San Jose Mercury News cut 16%, the Philadelphia Inquirer 15%—and that after cutting another 15% only five years earlier. By November, investors frustrated by poor financial performance forced one of the most cost-conscious newspaper chains of all, Knight Ridder, to be put up for sale.”

While circulation cuts in 2005 only amounted to 3 percent, and profit margins for newspapers remain near 20 percent, conditions left unchecked will certainly bring damaging effects to the nation’s newsgather, according to the study. It’s certainly an interesting read for those interested in the state of the news media.

Posted by Joel on April 01 2006 • Journalism

Beyond the Page

The Magazine Publishers of America has a nice online campaign highlighting the attributes of reading magazines. Did you know that across all demographics, the top 25 magazines deliver a greater audience than the top 25 television shows? Or that magazine readership grew by 25 percent between 1995 and 2004? Neither did I. You can find more information here.

Posted by Joel on April 01 2006 • Journalism