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The University of Cambridge has just posted the complete works of Charles Darwin online. It’s a very interesting site, filled with more than just the text of his important works. From their site: “This site currently contains more than 50,000 searchable text pages and 40,000 images of both publications and handwritten manuscripts. There is also…

Darwin Online

The University of Cambridge has just posted the complete works of Charles Darwin online. It’s a very interesting site, filled with more than just the text of his important works. From their site: “This site currently contains more than 50,000 searchable text pages and 40,000 images of both publications and handwritten manuscripts. There is also the most comprehensive Darwin bibliography ever published and the largest manuscript catalogue ever assembled. More than 150 ancillary texts are also included, ranging from secondary reference works to contemporary reviews, obituaries, published descriptions of Darwin’s Beagle specimens and important related works for understanding Darwin’s context.”

“Many of the scanned books provided here belonged to Darwin’s family or are signed by him.” I’ve already enjoyed looking at an 1845 edition of his book The Voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle. You will also find many audio files as well. A wonderful online treasure of material.

Posted by Joel on October 21 2006 • Multimedia

Romantic Interlude

One more publisher has left his post, this time from the Toronto Star. The New York Times has reported that Michael Goldbloom, publisher of the Toronto Star, has left his post. No reason was given, but the story hints that declining profits may have led to the resignation. In searching for profit, Torstar, the paper’s parent company, may have other areas of interest at the moment.

“Torstar has not been immune from the competitive pressures faced by newspapers. But in Torstar’s case, much of the recent focus has been on improving performance at Harlequin Enterprises, its romance novel unit.”

Posted by Joel on October 21 2006 • Journalism

Ousted Publishers

Publishers from two large U.S. newspapers (Miami and Los Angeles) ended their jobs (fired/resigned) this week. The pubisher of the Miami Herald stepped down, “saying he had lost control of his newsrooms over a growing controversy involving payments from the Bush administration to some reporters,” while the publisher of the Los Angeles Times was fired after he refused to bow to corporate pressure to continue cutting newsroom jobs. Strange days indeed for print journalism.

Posted by Joel on October 07 2006 • Journalism

Affluent Magazine Readers

Has reading print on paper become more of an activity for the affluent? And if so, which came first - Did magazines chase this demographic? Or have the demands of niche publications cause publishers to create more magazines aimed at those with money?

According to Linda Zebian, writing in Folio magazine, “Affluent people are spending more time reading magazines, according to the latest Mendelsohn Affluent Survey. The top quarter of U.S. households with current household incomes of $85,000 or higher are reading more magazines than ever before, citing increases over the previous year in both the number of publications read as well a the number of issues. According to the survey, 85.8 percent of participants claimed to read one publication or more, an estimated increase of 4 percent over last year’s figures. The average number of publication titles read increased from 6.2 to 6.9 while the average number of publication issues read increased about 12 percent since 2005.”

Further down in the article, Zebian writes, “The more than 25 million households that make up this demographic are a significant target market for advertisers and publishers, as they account for over 50 percent of total U.S. household incomes, according to the study.” It’s an interesting look at market demographics.

Posted by Joel on October 03 2006 • Journalism