hidden hit counter
From the Latest Entry...
I really like what Juliet Goodfriend has to say about a liberal education in her presentations. In this article, reporter Jeff Ignatius summarizes what she tells business leaders around the country:  that many people with business undergraduate degrees won’t have the critical-thinking and communication skills necessary to succeed in business. “You’ll never again have a…

What Shakespeare Can Teach Business

I really like what Juliet Goodfriend has to say about a liberal education in her presentations. In this article, reporter Jeff Ignatius summarizes what she tells business leaders around the country:  that many people with business undergraduate degrees won’t have the critical-thinking and communication skills necessary to succeed in business. “You’ll never again have a chance to learn from the humanities what they have to offer,” Goodfriend said in an interview last week, “and you’ll have every chance in the world to learn such subjects as marketing.”

Ignatius quotes Goodfriend later in his story: “Writing good narrative prose that has an understanding of plot and of the narrative arc is essential to presenting a business plan to a board of directors, or even to your boss.”

Goodfriend has a wonderful understanding of the importance of storytelling in business, and of how important that message is both inside and outside a company. Investors won’t have an understanding of what you stand for if all you have are a good understanding of the numbers, she says. They won’t understand you or where you want to go. Writes Ignatius: “Her message sounds like an offshoot of the “creative class” concept promoted by Richard Florida. Florida argues that an emergent group of creative people will increasingly drive the economy, and many communities are trying to capitalize by marketing themselves to this creative class.”

Posted by Joel on February 24 2007 • Journalism

Profitable Newsrooms

A new study has found that publishers who invest more in their newsrooms actually create more profitable newspapers. The report, issued by the University of Missouri, questions the accepted wisdom that publishers must cut jobs to save costs.

“The authors of the University of Missouri-Columbia study, which was based on 10 years of financial data, said news quality affects profit more than spending on circulation, advertising and other parts of the business,” writes Robert MacMillan from Reuters. Yet, for the time being, publishers continue to cut. “U.S. publishers have been eliminating jobs at many newspapers as part of larger efforts to trim expenses amid falling profit margins and, in the case of publicly traded chains, declining stock prices. According to job outplacement tracking firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, the number of planned job cuts in the U.S. media sector surged 88 percent to 17,809 last year.”

Posted by Joel on February 19 2007 • Journalism

After Newspapers?

An interesting essay in The Nation from John Nichols on the role of newspapers. He writes: “Newspapers may be the dinosaurs of America’s new-media age, hulking behemoths that cost too much to prepare and distribute and that cannot seem to attract young--or even middle-aged--readers in the numbers needed to survive. They may well have entered the death spiral that Philip Meyer, in his recent book The Vanishing Newspaper, predicts will conclude one day in 2043 as the last reader throws aside the final copy of a newspaper. But, as the Tester win illustrates, the dinosaurs still have enough life in them to guide--and perhaps even define--our politics.”

Posted by Joel on February 04 2007 • Journalism