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A recent Harrison Group study of today’s media environment has found that traditional media may be more resilient than expected in today’s fast evolving media enviornment. According to Ed Moran, director of product innovation in Deloitte’s New York office, in this report in Ad Week: “And one of the main activities online is going to…

State of Media Democracy

A recent Harrison Group study of today’s media environment has found that traditional media may be more resilient than expected in today’s fast evolving media enviornment. According to Ed Moran, director of product innovation in Deloitte’s New York office, in this report in Ad Week: “And one of the main activities online is going to a television Web site,” he said. The survey found that 46 percent of consumers do that regularly, including over half (52 percent) of all Gen Xers.

“Television is still a core activity,” Moran said. “Even though we see the expected amounts of online, text messaging, cellphone use [and] games—consumers are doing more things, but still watching television. It is always on.”

For advertisers, this could be “both troubling and reassuring,” he said, predicting that “participatory TV,” with some level of interactivity, will become more prevalent, especially as the millennial generation grows up.”

Posted by Joel on August 19 2007 • Journalism

After the Media Layoffs

An interesting story in the Columbia Journalism Review asked those who were layed off from the newsroom at the Dallas Morning News if they were better off for it. Some interesting perspectives. According to writers Craig Flournoy & Tracy Everbach, “We surveyed almost half of the two hundred who left the Morning News as well as dozens who stayed, and the findings are surprising. Whether they jumped or were pushed, most of those who left are more satisfied today than before they left. More than half managed to stay in journalism.

“Those who remain, meanwhile, say the mood is uncertain at best. Circulation is in freefall. Readers increasingly are dissatisfied. Turnover disrupts stability. Many older staff members were pushed out in the layoffs; now some of the younger ones are leaving on their own.”

Posted by Joel on August 04 2007 • Journalism