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"Often recounted, like the tales of Agincourt, with advantages, they present the reporter as a roguish knight-errant, a dashing adventurer with a streak of rat-like cunning. The stuff of countless Fleet Street memoirs, they are also the essence of the Watergate story and of newsroom dramas such as “The Front Page”. Today, however, such derring-do…

A History of News

"Often recounted, like the tales of Agincourt, with advantages, they present the reporter as a roguish knight-errant, a dashing adventurer with a streak of rat-like cunning. The stuff of countless Fleet Street memoirs, they are also the essence of the Watergate story and of newsroom dramas such as “The Front Page”. Today, however, such derring-do is rare, not just because telephones and live television make it unnecessary to rely on steamships and trains, but because the whole idea of news as a commodity owned and purveyed by journalists is slipping into history.”

So writes Brian Cathcart in More Intelligent Life, Winter 2009 issue. “If news, as a commodity purveyed by reporters, is coming to an end, when and how did it start?”

Posted by Joel on January 23 2010 • Journalism

Magazines and Tablets

This article was published a few weeks ago, but I wanted to draw attention to it because it shows what may be coming soon to the world of magazine publishing. As an Apple fan, I have been reading all of the rumors about the coming Apple Tablet (iSlate?) with excitement. When it is finally announced, it will represent another moment when Apple takes its place well ahead of the pack in directing the future of consumer electronics.

But more than another fun gadget for consumers, the Tablet represents a dramatic shift for publishers, particularly magazine publishers, in how they will engage their consumers. In my opinion, it will raise the magazine to ever greater prominence in today’s media enviornment. When unbound (pun intended) from the constraints of the physical page, writers and editors will have even greater freedom in how they tell their story (video, statistics, along with traditional narrative). I believe writers and editors with a traditional print background (those who think clearly about who their audience is and and what they need) will be well prepared to take great advantage of this new platform. Watch these demos and you will understand. It’s exciting, and I’m anxious to see what the upcoming news event from Apple will bring about. Please don’t dissappoint.

Posted by Joel on January 10 2010 • Multimedia