hidden hit counter
From the Latest Entry...
I’ve been a Pat Metheny fan for a long time, so I was really excited to learn last year that he was working on a new project. His CD is out, and I can’t recommend it highly enough. It’s called Orchestrion, bringing new meaning to the term one-man band. I will be there front and…

Orchestrion

I’ve been a Pat Metheny fan for a long time, so I was really excited to learn last year that he was working on a new project. His CD is out, and I can’t recommend it highly enough. It’s called Orchestrion, bringing new meaning to the term one-man band. I will be there front and center when he takes the stage at the Fitzgerald Theatre on May 9.

Here is how Pat describes his new project: “This project represents a conceptual direction that merges an idea from the late 19th and early 20th centuries with the technologies of today to create a new, open-ended platform for musical composition, improvisation and performance.

“Orchestrionics” is the term that I am using to describe a method of developing ensemble-oriented music using acoustic and acoustoelectric musical instruments that are mechanically controlled in a variety of ways, using solenoids and pneumatics. With a guitar, pen or keyboard I am able to create a detailed compositional environment or a spontaneously developed improvisation, with the pieces on this particular recording leaning toward the compositional side of the spectrum. On top of these layers of acoustic sound, I add my conventional electric guitar playing as an improvised component.

“At least for me, this takes the term “solo record” into some new and interesting areas, somewhat recontextualizing the idea of what constitutes a solo performance by a single musician. This project is the result of a lifelong dream in this area that dates back to my early youth.”

Posted by Joel on February 21 2010 • Personal

Wired's iPad App

It seems as if magazines are prepring for the iPad, despite their absence from Steve Job’s presentation. Sport’s Illustrated has unveiled a specific app for the tablet computer, and now Wired has unvelied their plans for the upcoming iPad. If they end up anything like these presentations, then perhaps magazine publishing is entering a new exciting age.

Posted by Joel on February 21 2010 • Multimedia

The Future of Reading

Josh Quittnor has a very good article posted on CNN about the iPad and the future of reading:

“The more I thought about it, the more I decided there was good news for the evolution of the publishing industry here—and better news. The good news is that 12-year-olds, just like their parents and their parents before them going all the way back to the publication of the first magazine in 1731 (the year Charles Darwin’s grandfather was born), still enjoy the medium. But they want it delivered in an exponentially more useful way.

“Raised to expect instant, sortable, searchable, savable, portable access to all the information in the world, these digital natives—tomorrow’s magazine subscribers, God and Steve Jobs willing—could well become the generation that saves the publishing industry.”

In the article, Quittnor addresses five key questions about the future of reading and the advent of tablet computers, including whether people will be willing to pay for online content, advertising and whether reading is dead. (No, it’s not. “Isn’t the idea of a magazine irrelevant in the atomized, buy-the-single-not-the-album world? If that were so, we’d expect to see fewer people reading magazines. But according to the Magazine Publishers Association, 174.5 million people paid to subscribe to magazines in 1970; that number has steadily and consistently risen over the years, to 324.8 million as of 2008.") I recommend you check it out.

Posted by Joel on February 15 2010 • Journalism

i-Mag Store?

"Apple has finally put to rest the rumors and added the iPad to its mix of products. I’m sure there’s more to come before the iPad is even offered to the public, but as this article asks: Where’s the magazine store?

From TUAW: “Sure, there’re sites like emagazines.com that offer browser-based magazines, but there’s no one universal storefront for emagazines that’s easy to use. Even Zinio doesn’t make the emagazine buying experience as easy or pleasurable as buy a song from the iTunes store. Can you imaging what an iMag app might be like?”

The TUAW post goes on to make the case that magazines could benefit greatly from an iTunes-based, or separate app, store. Sure, nothing is perfect. And magazines would sacrifice a bit of control of distribution to go through Apple. But it beats the alternative of doing nothing.

Posted by Joel on February 07 2010 • Multimedia