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Technology of composition can inspire. Is it the same with e-readers? From MIT Technology Review: “At a time when new media are proliferating, it is tempting to imagine that authors, thinking about how their writing will appear on devices such as electronic readers, tablet computers, or smartphones, consciously or unconsciously adapt their prose to the…

How Authors Write

Technology of composition can inspire. Is it the same with e-readers? From MIT Technology Review: “At a time when new media are proliferating, it is tempting to imagine that authors, thinking about how their writing will appear on devices such as electronic readers, tablet computers, or smartphones, consciously or unconsciously adapt their prose to the exigencies of publishing platforms. But that’s not what actually happens. One looks in vain for many examples of stories whose style or form has been cleverly adapted to their digital destinations. Stories on e-readers look pretty much as stories have always looked.”

Many readers and scholars alike attribute Kerouac’s stream-of-consciousness writing in On the Road to the fact that that he wrote the entire book on a continuous scroll of paper.

Posted by Joel on November 17 2012 • Multimedia

The Art of Making Magazines

Earlier this fall, Victor Navasky and Evan Cornog produced a volume of essays written by editors, writers, art directors and other about the “art” of putting together magazines: The Art of Making Magazines: On Being an Editor and Other Views from the Industry. It sounds great.

From their book description: “In this entertaining anthology, editors, writers, art directors, and publishers from such magazines as Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, The New Republic, Elle, and Harper’s draw on their varied, colorful experiences to explore a range of issues concerning their profession. Combining anecdotes with expert analysis, these leading industry insiders speak on writing and editing articles, developing great talent, effectively incorporating art and design, and the critical relationship between advertising dollars and content. They emphasize the importance of fact checking and copyediting; share insight into managing the interests (and potential conflicts) of various departments; explain how to parlay an entry-level position into a masthead title; and weigh the increasing influence of business interests on editorial decisions.”

Posted by Joel on November 04 2012 • Journalism