hidden hit counter
From the Latest Entry...
Krista Tippett’s show On Being is one of my favorite podcasts that I look forward to listening to every week. Her show is wonderful, but this recent rebroadcast from Rabbi David Hartman is especially good. Honest, open, thoughtful. The show’s description: “David Hartman died a year ago this week. The Orthodox rabbi was a charismatic…

Rabbi David Hartman on Hope

Krista Tippett’s show On Being is one of my favorite podcasts that I look forward to listening to every week. Her show is wonderful, but this recent rebroadcast from Rabbi David Hartman is especially good. Honest, open, thoughtful. The show’s description: “David Hartman died a year ago this week. The Orthodox rabbi was a charismatic and challenging figure in Israeli society, called a “public philosopher for the Jewish people” and a “champion of adaptive Judaism.” We remember his window into the unfolding of his tradition in the modern world — Judaism as a lens on the human condition.”

Posted by Joel on February 11 2014 •

Obsessing over punctuation

image"Good writing involves obsessing over punctuation marks” writes Kathryn Schulz in a post at Vulture. “It’s 1 a.m., you’ve got a 5,000-word piece due the next day, and for the last twenty minutes you’ve been deliberating about the use of a semicolon versus a period in a single sentence.” Been there. Why obsess over these “humble elements” of prose? Because when they are used effectively, they can have a large impact on the reader.

In her post, Schulz highlights five of the best examples of “remarkable punctuation” in literature. My favorite is the use of a colon in the opening line of A Christmas Carol. “This sentence is insane, or anyway destined to foment insanity in the grammatically prissy. It has death, a dangling participle, and a wonderfully garrulous narrator with some kind of unmentionable Victorian-era disease: wandering colon. It is great.”

Posted by Joel on February 01 2014 • Books