hidden hit counter
From the Latest Entry...
I’m looking forward to getting into John Taliaferro’s book called All the Great Prizes: The Life of John Hay, from Lincoln to Roosevelt. Young John Hay was an aide to President Lincoln. Throughout his career, he became friends with the important people of the era: Mark Twain, Horace Greeley, Henry Adams, Henry James, and “virtually…

All the Great Prizes

I’m looking forward to getting into John Taliaferro’s book called All the Great Prizes: The Life of John Hay, from Lincoln to Roosevelt. Young John Hay was an aide to President Lincoln. Throughout his career, he became friends with the important people of the era: Mark Twain, Horace Greeley, Henry Adams, Henry James, and “virtually every president, sovereign, author, artist, power broker, and robber baron of the Gilded Age,” according the book’s description at Barnes and Noble.

“John Hay was both witness and author of many of the most significant chapters in American history— from the birth of the Republican Party, the Civil War, and the Spanish-American War, to the prelude to the First World War. Much of what we know about Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt comes to us through the observations Hay made while private secretary to one and secretary of state to the other. With All the Great Prizes, the first authoritative biography of Hay in eighty years, Taliaferro has turned the lens around, rendering a rich and fascinating portrait of this brilliant American and his many worlds.”

Here, the author speaks about his book and John Hay’s remarkable life:

Posted by Joel on May 28 2014 • Books

The Illusion of Life

This video came to me from a link provided by Jeremy Zilar, blog specialist and content strategist for the New York Times. It is called The Illusion of Life, and it was posted on Vimeo by cento lodigiani: “The 12 basic principles of animation were developed by the ‘old men’ of Walt Disney Studios, amongst them Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, during the 1930s. Of course they weren’t old men at the time, but young men who were at the forefront of exciting discoveries that were contributing to the development of a new art form. These principles came as a result of reflection about their practice and through Disney’s desire to use animation to express character and personality. This movie is my personal take on those principles, applied to simple shapes. Like a cube.”

The illusion of life from cento lodigiani on Vimeo.

Posted by Joel on May 23 2014 • Multimedia

Demographics and the U.S. Economy

The looming retirement of the Baby Boom generation could steer the economy into some pretty rough seas. This story from Five Thirty Eight Economics puts it into some perspective.

“All else equal, fewer workers means less economic growth. One way to measure this is a figure known as the “dependency ratio,” or the number of people outside of working age (under 18 or over 64) per 100 adults between age 18 and 64.2 The higher the ratio, the worse the news: If more of the population is young or old that leaves fewer working-age people to support them and contribute to the economy”

image

Posted by Joel on May 08 2014 • Current Affairs