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"Most marketers no longer need convincing that content marketing is the key strategy to engage customers,” writes Carlos Hidalgo in the October issue of Chief Content Officer. “But too many organizations try to juice returns by generating more content through more channels at faster speeds. Such an approach is doomed to fail.” Why do they…

A Buyer Centric Content Strategy

image"Most marketers no longer need convincing that content marketing is the key strategy to engage customers,” writes Carlos Hidalgo in the October issue of Chief Content Officer. “But too many organizations try to juice returns by generating more content through more channels at faster speeds. Such an approach is doomed to fail.”

Why do they do it? It’s the technology, writes Hidalgo, and the increasing number of options: cloud-based platforms, dynamic web pages, a wealth of social media channels and countless other innovations aim to help marketers automate processes and scale their efforts. Just push another button, and better and better tools will make marketing magic happen.”

Hildalgo outlines a plan for developing a real buyer-centric content marketing strategy. I would recommend all marketers read his story. “The key question is not how fast, how easily or how much marketers are able to disseminate; instead, you must ask what kind of content will best connect your brand with your buyers and customers.”

Posted by Joel on October 06 2015 • Content Marketing

The History of Cartography

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Called the “most ambitious overview of map making ever undertaken,” by Edward Rothstein in the New York Times, The History of Cartography, published by the University of Chicago, is now available free online. The first three volumes can be found here. “People come to know the world the way they come to map it—through their perceptions of how its elements are connected and of how they should move among them,” wrote Rothstein. “This is precisely what the series is attempting by situating the map at the heart of cultural life and revealing its relationship to society, science, and religion.”

From the University of Chicago site: “The first volume of the History of Cartography was published in 1987 and the three books that constitute Volume Two appeared over the following eleven years. In 1987 the worldwide web did not exist, and since 1998 book publishing has gone through a revolution in the production and dissemination of work. Although the large format and high quality image reproduction of the printed books (see right column) are still well-suited to the requirements for the publishing of maps, the online availability of material is a boon to scholars and map enthusiasts.”

Posted by Joel on October 04 2015 • Multimedia