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Tablet has an interesting story written by a “struggling writer” who attends a content marketing conference in Boston. “The future of media is here,” writes Sean Cooper, “and I was there. “The S.W. is here because the roaring fire that was 20th-century nonfiction magazine literature has been hosed down to wet coals,” writes Cooper. “In…

The Future of Media

imageTablet has an interesting story written by a “struggling writer” who attends a content marketing conference in Boston. “The future of media is here,” writes Sean Cooper, “and I was there.

“The S.W. is here because the roaring fire that was 20th-century nonfiction magazine literature has been hosed down to wet coals,” writes Cooper. “In this new 21st-century post-literature era, the techniques and tools of the journalism trade have been plundered by scavenger industries, which rightly foresaw profit opportunities in what has been called branded content, native advertising, or content marketing, which agglomerates techniques used to build characters, create narrative arcs, and establish tones of voice that once served as conduits for nonfiction writers attempting to intimately mind-meld with readers. While journalism continues to struggle, burgled storytelling devices are being leveraged at scale by content-marketing agencies and branding studios that publish content stories to satisfy shareholder expectations. One industry analysis estimates that the content-marketing business will be worth $215 billion in 2017. The Struggling Writer is here to see them count the money.”

Another interesting insight:

“In the absence of stories told by humans to communicate about being human, companies tell people stories about being consumers. Readers consume the information made available to them in this way because they are unable to turn off the human impulse to understand the world.”

And another:

“Being a journalist today requires the maintenance of an active presence on the same social-media platforms and search engines that took away all the advertising dollars that once supported journalism. Today, 80 percent of all new digital advertisements are booked through Facebook and Google. The journalists are curating their work on behalf of these stock-traded corporations that thrive by selling advertisements against work they have not commissioned. Everyone ultimately works for the social-media platforms.”

It’s certainly an interesting time for journalists who are making a transition from journalism toward ... something else.

Posted by Joel on May 20 2017 • Content Marketing

Field Notes

Notebooks are making a comeback; there’s something to be said about pen and paper. I prefer Moleskine notebooks, but Field Notes makes an array of notebooks as well. These (from a collection called National Crop Edition) draw their inspiration from promotional notebooks given to American farmers over the past 100 years from seed, tractor, and other agricultural companies. Pretty cool.

Posted by Joel on May 07 2017 • Multimedia